Get involved

Do you love communicating science? Are you interested in helping out with one of our events? Then become a volunteer with Science Brainwaves!

We run numerous fun, science-themed activities for children of all ages (adults can join in too!) at fairs throughout the year at various locations around Sheffield. Recent activities have included extracting strawberry DNA, sweet chromatography and pathogen modelling and much more! We also run an after-school club called Neutrinos, which you are more than welcome to come and help out with!

If you are participating in the Sheffield Graduate Award, keep track of the hours you volunteer for us with this form.

Volunteering

You must sign up to Sheffield Volunteering and also please read through and sign the safeguarding information.

Get on the mailing list opposite and look out for updates. If you see anything you fancy, in the newsletter or in our events, just email us back saying you're interested!

Sign up to hear about new volunteering opportunities

Blogging

To blog, simply send us an email with a brief explanation of what you'd like to write about. If you've got any written work already published online, please link us, we'd love to see it!

We'll get in touch and you can start right away!

Why get involved?

Beki Hill

"Planning the first Christmas lecture was what made me realise I wanted to go into science communication after my PhD, and officially setting up Science Brainwaves just afterwards was a massive step in the right direction. After an amazing year, where we launched the website, recruited masses of volunteers, organised events and headed off to Green Man festival, I left Sheffield to do a science journalism MA. I’m now genetics editor of BioNews and a freelance journalist, having written for New Scientist, Nature and Research Fortnight."
2015-08-17T16:01:38+00:00
"Planning the first Christmas lecture was what made me realise I wanted to go into science communication after my PhD, and officially setting up Science Brainwaves just afterwards was a massive step in the right direction. After an amazing year, where we launched the website, recruited masses of volunteers, organised events and headed off to Green Man festival, I left Sheffield to do a science journalism MA. I’m now genetics editor of BioNews and a freelance journalist, having written for New Scientist, Nature and Research Fortnight."

Tacita Nye

"In addition to my roles as secretary in 2010-11, I wanted to get more involved in the science communication work of the charity. I volunteered at school outreach days and organised my own public engagement event – ‘The Science of Cocktails’, with Noel Jackson from the Centre for Life. The even was hugely successful - with newspaper coverage, a radio interview and most importantly an audience of 100 people engaged in SCIENCE!

One of the highlights from my year as Chair in 2011-12 is successfully gaining funding and training for us to carry out the nationwide Wellcome Trust funded project ‘Hands on DNA: A Question of Taste’. I also have fond memories of supporting the wonderful committee in establishing a radio show, outreach events with local Scout groups, schools, after-schools clubs and developing new workshops. It was a fantastic year and I am very proud to have been part of such a wonderful adventure, I’ve made some wonderful friends and the icing on the cake for me was when we won the Sir Walter Bodmer Award in 2012."
2015-08-17T16:39:51+00:00
"In addition to my roles as secretary in 2010-11, I wanted to get more involved in the science communication work of the charity. I volunteered at school outreach days and organised my own public engagement event – ‘The Science of Cocktails’, with Noel Jackson from the Centre for Life. The even was hugely successful - with newspaper coverage, a radio interview and most importantly an audience of 100 people engaged in SCIENCE! One of the highlights from my year as Chair in 2011-12 is successfully gaining funding and training for us to carry out the nationwide Wellcome Trust funded project ‘Hands on DNA: A Question of Taste’. I also have fond memories of supporting the wonderful committee in establishing a radio show, outreach events with local Scout groups, schools, after-schools clubs and developing new workshops. It was a fantastic year and I am very proud to have been part of such a wonderful adventure, I’ve made some wonderful friends and the icing on the cake for me was when we won the Sir Walter Bodmer Award in 2012."

Michaela Livingstone

"My initial responsibility for Science Brainwaves was designing and implementing a website, and coordinating a small team of volunteers to help develop and maintain it. Further down the line I took on more and more responsibilities, for planning and executing events and activities. I did this during my doctoral studies. I gained valuable experience with time management, planning and budgeting. A really important aspect of what I did was bringing people together – whether this was through recruiting volunteers to get involved with Brainwaves, or shaping activities with external partners."

Michaela is now a Science Communications Officer at the University of Oxford, managing and coordinating the activities and development of the Oxford Sparks programme. This includes website maintenance, online communications, video and podcast and associated learning resources production, public engagement training for researchers and strategy development.
2015-08-17T16:34:16+00:00
A really important aspect of what I did was bringing people together – whether this was through recruiting volunteers to get involved with Brainwaves, or shaping activities with external partners.
Martin Turner

Martin Turner

"I was one of the four founding members of Science Brainwaves and later became director. I went straight from my Ph.D into a job in science policy at the Association of Medical Research Charities; it’s a job that I love and there aren’t that many jobs going in it so I feel very lucky.

I truly believe that I wouldn’t have got where I am without Science Brainwaves on my CV. I learnt how to write properly for a range of audiences through blogging, writing news articles and preparing grant proposals to get money for our events. It gave me so many experiences to draw upon in interviews: how I’ve worked in a team but also been a leader, how I’ve dealt with pressure or worked to a deadline and how I’ve approached seemingly insurmountable problems. But most of all I’ve been able to show that I’ve taken the initiative to achieve something quite unique. The great thing about Science Brainwaves is that it’s run by students and so you can have the opportunity to make it what you want, to be creative and really have something significant and different to show for your hard work."
2015-08-17T16:42:14+00:00
Martin Turner
"I was one of the four founding members of Science Brainwaves and later became director. I went straight from my Ph.D into a job in science policy at the Association of Medical Research Charities; it’s a job that I love and there aren’t that many jobs going in it so I feel very lucky. I truly believe that I wouldn’t have got where I am without Science Brainwaves on my CV. I learnt how to write properly for a range of audiences through blogging, writing news articles and preparing grant proposals to get money for our events. It gave me so many experiences to draw upon in interviews: how I’ve worked in a team but also been a leader, how I’ve dealt with pressure or worked to a deadline and how I’ve approached seemingly insurmountable problems. But most of all I’ve been able to show that I’ve taken the initiative to achieve something quite unique. The great thing about Science Brainwaves is that it’s run by students and so you can have the opportunity to make it what you want, to be creative and really have something significant and different to show for your hard work."