Reproduction Revamp: Stick Insects and Going It Alone.

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Timema cristinae: making a lack of a love life cool.

Love can be tough. If you wish awkward dates and trawling through match.com were a thing of the past, you could take a leaf out of this stick insect’s book. Tanja Schwander (University of Lausanne) studies how Timema stick insects are changing the dating game. Rather than reproducing with a partner, female Timema have developed the ability to produce offspring individually.  There could be a number of causes for this bizarre transition from sexual to non-sexual offspring production, so read on for a how-to guide in ditching dating.

Conversion to non-sexual reproduction may occur genetically. When female Timema are prevented from mating, some eggs that haven’t been fertilised by sperm hatch and develop. Could this virgin birth scenario, reminiscent of biblical times, replace sexual reproduction in Timema? Or are virgin births merely a strategy to ensure female stick insects can carry on their line when opportunities to mate are thin on the ground?

Alternatively, a type of bacterial infection may stimulate non-sexual reproduction. Infecting bacteria are only transmitted through the female sex cell, the egg, and so males slow the spread of the bacteria. In light of this, the bacteria devised a cunning strategy to eliminate males: inducing a kind of non-sexual reproduction that produces only female offspring. Could bacterial infection be the instigator of non-sexual reproduction?

Schwander’s studies of genetic data reveal the virgin birth scenario cannot explain the change in Timema reproduction. Conversion to non-sexual reproduction may occur genetically, but not via virgin births. To determine if bacterial infection causes the stick insect’s lack of libido, Schwander cured the infection. This restored sexual reproduction and production of male offspring, proving bacterial infection can result in non-sexual reproduction. Watch this space; could Boots’ next bestseller be bacteria to eliminate human males?